student raising hand in class

Curriculum Guide

The academic program at ANC is built around a core curriculum that prepares students for life after secondary school. As they advance, students can take advantage of greater opportunities to specialize, and behind every course and every lesson is a challenge to ponder the deeper questions in life. 

Curriculum Guide Tools:

For a list of courses by grade level, highlight the appropriate departmental tabs below; to get an idea of what each course involves, click the individual course descriptions at the bottom of the tab.

Academic Departments

Arts

Grade 9: Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Instrumental Music; Fundamentals of Fine Art†

 

Grade 10: Ceramics; Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Drawing and Introduction to Oils; Instrumental Ensemble; Photography; Printmaking

 

Grade 11: Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Instrumental Ensemble; Drawing and Painting; Performing Arts Portfolio; Pottery; Printmaking; Stagecraft; Stained Glass; Visual Arts Portfolio

 

Grade 12: Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Creative Drawing and Painting; Instrumental Ensemble; Performing Arts Portfolio; Photography; Sculpture; Stagecraft; Stained Glass; Visual Arts Portfolio

The Art Department is dedicated to providing students with an environment in which they can learn to express their own creativity in both the Visual and Performing Arts, and to integrate that art into the world around them.

Grade 9: Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Instrumental Music; Fundamentals of Fine Art

Grade 10: Ceramics; Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Drawing and Introduction to Oils; Instrumental Ensemble; Photography; Printmaking

Grade 11: Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Instrumental Ensemble; Drawing and Painting; Performing Arts Portfolio; Pottery; Printmaking; Stagecraft; Stained Glass; Visual Arts Portfolio

Grade 12: Choral Ensemble; Costuming; Creative Drawing and Painting; Instrumental Ensemble; Performing Arts Portfolio; Photography; Sculpture; Stagecraft; Stained Glass; Visual Arts Portfolio

For full course descriptions, click the individual course descriptions below.

Arts Course Descriptions

Fundamentals of Fine Art - Grade 9 - All Grades Coed

Fundamentals of Fine Art is the foundation upon which all other departmental courses are based. Students will demonstrate through performance, creation, and analysis that they have learned the basic terms and concepts which are essential to a real understanding of the fine arts. The course will cover music, drama, and visual arts. Required of all freshmen.

Choral Ensemble - All Grades Coed

Choral Music is a twelve-week elective that is available all three terms, and is open to any grade level in the school. Students will work with a wide variety of music ranging from classical choral pieces to New Church contemporary to Broadway classics. There are four concerts during the year, including a Christmas show, and many other performance opportunities. 

Costuming - All Grades, Coed

This course focuses on the main elements of costume/clothing design theory and history, and will teach the students basic cutting and sewing techniques. Students will undertake the study of color, line, function and character in the design and construction of costumes for ANC's yearly theatrical productions. Students will be taught to cut, interpret and read patterns, create patterns, choose fabric, and construct garments as well as do alterations on existing garments. 6th period; 2 credits per term; may be taken any or all terms.

Instrumental Ensemble - All Grades, Coed

This class meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, and culminates in the Performing Arts Night at the end of each term. 6th period; 2 credits per term.

Dance Team - All Grades, Coed

Dance team is open to all students regardless of previous training. The dance team is set up in order to accommodate both advanced dancers as well as students who have never had the opportunity to try it. Dance training and choreography include a variety of styles, such as contemporary, jazz, tap, theater dance, hip hop, and ballet. Dancers perform multiple numbers each term at dance concerts and Performing Arts Nights, as well as participate in other performance opportunities at the school and in the community. The Dance Team meets daily for two hours in the afternoon. Fulfills the P.E./Athletics requirement for up to two terms. May be taken any or all terms.

Drawing and Introduction to Oils - Grade 10, Coed

This course introduces students to drawing and painting from direct observation. Students will learn to see shapes and articulate them through the use of gesture, line, volume, perspective, composition, and value. Lectures will consist of abstract ideas supported by examples from historical and contemporary artists. The class will explore the genres of still life, landscape, and the human figure through the use of charcoal, pencil, and oil paint. The instructor tailors critiques to meet every student’s skill level, no prior experience is necessary. The class is limited to 18 students per section with a  $10.00 lab fee.

Ceramics - Grade 10, Coed

An introductory studio course designed to teach the technical skills and art associated with clay. Students will learn how to shape, carve, build with and glaze clay. Each project will have a New Church component and working with coils and slabs will help students come to better understand the concept of form. Discussions and examples will introduce students to historical artists, theories, and New Church ideas relating to art. Limited to 16 students per section, $10.00 Lab Fee.

Photography 1 - Grades 10 and 12, Coed

This course is designed as an introduction to the art of black and white photography. The student will learn how to creatively use the darkroom and the camera as well as develop their own film. Prior photographic experience is not necessary for this course. Access to an SLR camera is highly recommended. Limited to 12 students.

Printmaking - Grades 11 and 12, Coed

Two-dimensional exploration of printmaking techniques (intaglio, relief, stencil and silk-screen printing) with an emphasis on woodblock and linoleum prints. The course will include a series of small projects which will range from a stress on the quality of an edition of prints (registration, consistency of image and tone) to one-of-a-kind prints or monotypes. Final projects will involve the printing of an edition, the production of a small book, or similar projects. Students will be encouraged to use ideas from other classes (Creative Writing, Drawing and Painting) and will have an opportunity to examine various actual prints and learn about printmaking history. Limited to 16 students per section.

Stagecraft - Grades 11 and 12, Coed

Stagecraft is a twelve-week junior and senior elective that begins with thorough analysis of the current musical being performed at the school. We then move through a design process much like what the students would encounter in a professional scene shop. They begin with basic sketches that are refined into scale elevations and plot plans, and finally scale models. The students then shift to the construction phase of the class, learning how to use a wide variety of power tools and how to read actual construction blueprints. The final product is the theatrical set that is used for the spring musical production.

Drawing and Painting - Grade 11, Coed

This course is designed to strengthen drawing and painting skills through direct observation. Students will learn how to create interesting compositions through the use of shape, gesture, line, value, color, and perspective. The class will explore still life, landscape, and the human figure as subjects. Students will use drawing and painting materials such as pencil, charcoal, and oil paint. Lectures will introduce students to conceptual ideas and contemporary and historical artists. The instructor tailors critiques to meet each individual's skill and experience level. No prior experience is required. The class is limited to 18 students per section with a $10.00 Lab Fee.

Pottery - Grade 11, Coed

A studio course designed to teach the technical skills and art associated with clay. Students will learn how to make functional ceramic pieces such as: mugs, bowls and pitchers using the potters wheel and other hand-building techniques. Students will also be taught how to decorate and glaze their work. Discussions and examples will focus on historical artists, theories of form and craftsmanship in connection with New Church ideas and teachings. Limited to 16 students, $10.00 Lab Fee.

Performing Arts Portfolio - Grades 11 and 12, Coed

Students study vocal technique, dance technique, character development and are exposed to multiple shows throughout the year. The majority of class time is spent developing and rehearsing performance pieces from both past and current Broadway shows. Students are also required to be involved in some capacity in both theatrical productions at ANC, as well as write critiques, research theater history, stage their own performance pieces in student groups, and attend professional performances. Students participate in four concerts a year at the Mitchell Performing Arts Center, as well as other performances throughout the year.

Stained Glass - Grades 11 and 12, Coed

An exploration of a centuries old art form. Students will explore two-dimensional design with an emphasis on the foil method of construction. The course will examine some of the history of stained glass design as well as the history of glass making in Bryn Athyn. The course will use Glencairn and the Bryn Athyn Cathedral as a visual laboratory and students will design and produce their own pieces in the school's own facilities. Techniques in glass painting will also be introduced. Limited to 16 students.

Visual Arts Portfolio - Grades 11 and 12, Coed

A year long course providing an opportunity for dedicated students to study fine arts more rigorously. Students studying the fine arts will spend the first term building a body of work in their chosen medium (Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Photography). Then learning how to photograph, edit and assemble their work into a portfolio during the second term. And in third term students will spend time learning practical art skills such as: stretching and preparing canvases, matting and framing, making paint, etc. ultimately leading up to a grand student-run exhibition. Course is open to juniors and seniors, and may be taken twice. ($25 lab fee for fine art students.)

Creative Drawing and Painting - Grade 12, Coed

This course is designed to challenge and build on foundational drawing and painting concepts and will enable students to develop their skills as a draftsperson and painter. As students develop their skills they will acquire more freedom to express creativity. Students will work from direct observation focusing on still life, landscape, and the human figure. Lectures will consist of conceptual ideas illustrated by examples from both contemporary and historical artists. A variety of mediums will be introduced, including but not limited to: pencil, charcoal, and oil paint. The class will have the opportunity to take trips to sketch onsite at the Cathedral, Glencairn, and around campus. The instructor tailors critiques to meet each individual's experience and skill, no prior experience is required. Repeat students are challenged to hone their skills and strengthen creative thinking. The class is limited to 18 students per section with a $10.00 Lab Fee.

Sculpture - Grade 12, Coed

A culminating studio course that builds upon the skills taught in previous art electives. This course focuses on expression and communication using the human form as a subject and clay as a primary medium. Through creation and discussion students will gain a better understanding of art, both historical and contemporary. Assignments will challenge students to find ways to express themselves and employ New Church teachings in their sculptures. Limited to 16 students per section, $10.00 Lab Fee.

English

The study of English at ANC is focused on developing our students' ability to express and understand ideas, so they can flourish in the life after high school, and gain a deeper understanding of themselves and their own role in society.

Grade 9: English 1; English Comp./Lit./Reading

Grade 10: English 2

Grade 11: Honors English 3; English 3

Grade 12: Honors English 4; English 4; Intro to Film

For full course descriptions, click the individual course descriptions below. 

English Course Descriptions

English 1, Girls

This course serves as an introduction to all genres from classic to modern literature. Various artistic forms will be studied including epic poetry, the novel and short stories. Emphasis will be placed upon fundamental written analysis and literary interpretation.

English 1, Boys

This course seeks to improve English skills, including reading, articulating ideas out loud, and writing. Different assignments will focus and emphasize improving different skills. English class is all about how humans communicate with each other, and communication is all about expressing what a person wants.

● Characters express what they want through inner monologue, dialogue, actions, and interactions with other characters.

● Authors express what they want from the reader through a myriad of literary devices such as character, setting, and theme.

● Teachers express what they want from their students through oral and written instructions (kind of like what you are reading right now).

As teachers, our goal is to make our students better communicators.

English 9, Composition, Literature, and Reading

This course is designed to develop, build, and strengthen essential English skills such as grammar, sentence structure, paragraph formation, vocabulary, and the basic structure of the five paragraph essay. In addition, through reading selected stories and novels, the student will strengthen reading skills and their knowledge of literary terms. The focus will be on working intensively with the students to build skill and thus confidence to succeed at the high school level.

English 2, Girls

This course builds on the fundamentals of literary techniques and analysis learned in Freshman English. A particular emphasis is placed on developing an increased compassion for the human condition via storytelling and writing. Course material includes myths, legends and Bible stories, modern short stories, classical fairy tales, To Kill a Mockingbird, Much Ado About Nothing and A Raisin in the Sun.  A grammar review, as well as multiple essay-writing workshops, are designed to enhance the students’ technical and creative writing proficiency. Students give frequent oral presentations, write reading responses, essays, critical analyses, original stories and frequent entries in their journals.  They also complete one research project.

English 2, Boys

This course builds on the fundamentals of literary techniques and analysis learned in Freshman English. A particular emphasis is placed on the development of effective communication skills with the hope that students will improve their ability to read, write, listen and speak with clarity. Students use journaling and discussion to consider their own lives and values through the experiences of the characters they read about. Grammar and sentence structure are reviewed and effort is made toward developing a mastery of the five paragraph essay. Public speaking plays a prominent role in the weekly schedule of the class. Major texts in the recent past have included: Of Mice and MenThe Green MileLord of the FliesFist Stick Knife Gun, and Animal Farm, along with selected myths, fairy tales, and short stories

English 3, Girls

A chronological survey of American literature from the Puritan Age to the 20th century. Consideration will be given to the transition of cultural thought from one literary period to the next. Texts studied include the classic works The Scarlet Letter and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as well as more modern or contemporary pieces such as The Glass Menagerie and The House on Mango Street. In conjunction with analysis, this course emphasizes a varied approach to the appreciation and understanding of literature. This course offers both a standard and honors track.

In addition to regular coursework, honors track expectations will include the following:

  • all essay tests - students will have some choice with the questions, but must complete four essays within the allotted time
  • 4-6 page Scarlet Letter paper employing an immediate thesis style, whereby the thesis comes in the opening statement vs. the five-paragraph location
  • research a 20c. literary period and face off on Q+A panel of their peers
  • lead at least one class discussion on a given text
  • daily evince personal engagement with the text to augment regular class discussions

English 3, Boys

19th Century – Current Affairs Literature. The goal of this English class is to make students better communicators. This course will hone communication skills. Different assignments will focus on and emphasize improving certain areas. This class is not Freshman English all over again. It is designed to be harder, push students more, and get them ready for senior year and beyond high school.

Think of English class like a gym for the brain. The brain needs exercise or it will stagnate and eventually atrophy. Similar to the gym, if we only do what is easy and comfortable it is difficult to make progress. One of the goals is to make students leave your comfort zone while still staying safe. One of the methods teachers use to gauge progress is through students' ability to read, comprehend, and follow directions. It indicates whether they understand or not. This course will focus on three main questions: Do you prefer to live in blissful ignorance (darkness), or suffer under the weight of knowledge (light of understanding)? How does the Liminal State play a role in our search for truth and wisdom? Why did the author feel compelled to write this story? This syllabus covers both College Prep and Honors Track. For those that take the Honors Track, more is expected in all aspects of the class, including academic, civil, and moral behavior.

English 4, Girls

This course provides a survey of British Literature from the Medieval Era through the Modern Era (20th Century) with a sprinkling of Contemporary selections. Along the way, students will be writing about, speaking about, and analyzing the literature. We will be seeking timeless common themes such as moral and spiritual values, power, social class, and relationships. We will also be focusing on the power of effective communication.

English 4, Boys

This course examines what it means to be a good citizen, a good husband, and a good father. The written works for this course are: Elements of Style (Strunk and White), Beowulf (Burton Raffel, Translation), Ordinary People (Judith Guest), The Things They Carried (Tim O'Brien), Bright Lights, Big City (Jay McInerney), Life of Pi (Yann Martel), One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Ken Kesey), Hamlet (William Shakespeare), and How Green Was My Valley (Richard Llewellyn). In addition to reading, students will receive several opportunities to demonstrate their writing talents. Senior English ultimately aims to help young men cultivate wisdom by aligning their intelligence with charity. The Advanced Placement option is Honors Weight and has prerequisites, some which must be fulfilled prior to the start of school in the fall.

Introduction to Film - Grade 12, Coed

This course serves as an introduction to the study of film with an emphasis on developing the language and general understanding necessary to read a film as a text and discuss it as an art form. The overall goal of the course is for students to conduct a critical dialogue with themselves before, during, and after viewing a film.

Science

The Science Department is dedicated to the study of the natural world and the spiritual principles that underlie it.

Grade 9: Introductory Physical Science†

Grade 10: Biology†

Grade 11: Chemistry; Honors Chemistry; Environmental Science; Physics

Grade 12: Chemistry; Honors Chemistry; Environmental Science; Human Anatomy and Physiology†; Physics

For full course descriptions, click the individual course descriptions below. 

Science Course Descriptions

Introductory Physical Science, Girls

Everything in the natural world derives its origin from the spiritual world, thus from the Lord through the heat and light of the spiritual sun. An appreciation for the matter that comprises the natural world and how it functions in an orderly framework is a primary goal of this introductory course. The ability to deal with problems in an orderly and systematic manner is imperative to the development of the rational and therefore to the ability to discern the intricacies of matter. This introductory course in Physical Science involves the constant search for information and understanding of the universe. It involves an introduction to chemistry and physics. Laboratory safety and techniques will be emphasized. Lecture, video, demonstrations and guest speakers will be utilized. An organized science binder is required and graded. Other areas of graded returns include class participation, classwork, homework, lab reports, quizzes and chapter tests. Some selected topics include: science inquiry, scientific method, the metric system, scientific notation, the atom, the periodic table, matter, density, chemical reactions, chemical formulas, chemical bonding, forces, motion, acceleration, mechanical advantage, simple machines, energy, and electricity. Cooperative group work is emphasized.

Introductory Physical Science, Boys

Everything in the natural world derives its origin from the spiritual world, thus from the Lord through the heat and light of the spiritual sun. An appreciation for the matter that comprises the natural world and how it functions in an orderly framework is a primary goal of this introductory course. The ability to deal with problems in an orderly and systematic manner is imperative to the development of the rational and therefore to the ability to discern the intricacies of matter. This introductory course in Physical Science involves the constant search for information and understanding of the universe. It involves an introduction to chemistry and physics. Laboratory safety and techniques will be emphasized. Lecture, video, and demonstrations will be utilized. Other areas of graded returns include homework, lab reports, quizzes and chapter tests. Some selected topics include: scientific method, the metric system, scientific notation, acceleration, density, mechanical advantage, the periodic table, chemical formulas and chemical bonding. Cooperative group work is emphasized.

Biology, Girls

An introduction to the study of living things with emphasis on the fundamental unity in the diversity of life forms. Topics of study will include the characteristics and diversity of life, heredity, the plant and animal kingdoms, and environmental biology. Biology will be studied from both scientific and philosophical viewpoints. Studying science in this way encourages the student to combine both natural and spiritual truth, indeed, all of experience, into a consistent, rational pattern which relates to life and work. One primary objective is to make the student a good observer. The difference between observation and interpretation will also be stressed.

Biology, Boys

An introduction to the study of living things with emphasis on the fundamental unity in the diversity of life forms. Topics of study will include the characteristics and diversity of life, heredity, the plant and animal kingdoms, and environmental biology. Biology will be studied from both scientific and philosophical viewpoints. Studying science in this way encourages the student to combine both natural and spiritual truth, indeed, all of experience, into a consistent, rational pattern which relates to life and work. One primary objective is to make the student a good observer. The difference between observation and interpretation will also be stressed.

Human Anatomy and Physiology, Girls

he objective of this course is to help students gain a firm foundation in the scientific knowledge of human anatomy and physiology while at the same time stressing the intuitive thinking required to relate natural effects to their spiritual causes using the correspondences of Divine revelation.

Human Anatomy and Physiology, Boys

he objective of this course is to help students gain a firm foundation in the scientific knowledge of human anatomy and physiology while at the same time stressing the intuitive thinking required to relate natural effects to their spiritual causes using the correspondences of Divine revelation.

Chemistry, Grades 11 or 12

All of the Lord’s creation is in Equilibrium. Chemistry studies the mechanisms of equilibrium. There is a cause and effect relationship in all things of creation. Chemistry explains this cause and effect relationship at the atomic level. There is beauty and harmony in the Lord’s created universe. Chemistry helps to order and understand this universe. The study of science is an excellent means of developing freedom and rationality as the student acquires the skills of inquiry using the scientific method and the ability to synthesize information. This is an introductory course dealing with the basic concepts of chemistry. The primary emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorization of terms and technical details. This is accomplished through personal experience in scientific inquiry, recognition of unifying themes that integrate the major topics of Chemistry, and application of chemical knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns. Laboratory work, lectures, video, cooperative group work and demonstrations are utilized. Evaluation is based on class participation, lab reports, classwork, an organized science binder, homework, quizzes, chapter tests, and a comprehensive final exam. Some selected topics emphasized include: science inquiry, scientific method, measurement, matter, the atom, the periodic table, chemical reactions, writing chemical formulas, balancing chemical equations, heat transfer, energy, the mole concept, stoichiometry, the gas laws, and solutions. 

Honors Chemistry, Grade 11 or 12

This course is an introduction to the principles of chemistry through an extensive combination of laboratory work, lectures, and demonstrations supported by special films designed for high school chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method including the uncertainty of measurement and the handling of scientific uncertainties. Topics include extensive formula writing, equation balancing, oxidation/reduction, enthalpy/entropy, reactions, kinetics, determination of reaction heats, and the electrical nature of matter. Most topics are developed quantitatively with an accent on stoichiometry and problem solving. This includes Ka, Ksp and Eo concepts. It is highly recommended that students enrolled in this course have a combined average no lower than 85 for all previous science courses. Students with combined science averages less than an 85 must submit a request in writing to the Department to be considered for the course. The request will then be considered by the Science Department. This is an honors course for students of ability and motivation in science. Students are required to take a standardized comprehensive exam at the end of the year. Honors weight.

Physics, Grade 11 or 12

A course that develops scientific measurement and analysis of distance, motion, and force phenomena in nature. Topics covered include analysis of straight line and two dimensional mechanics, work and energy, wave mechanics, sound, light and optics, as well as static electricity, circuitry and electrodynamics. Some consideration may also be given to thermodynamics. The course presents physics as a methodical and systematic explanation of natural phenomena and seeks to develop a critical awareness and analytical judgment, as well as a New Church perspective. Trigonometric methods are used in studying vectors involving two dimensional motion and forces. Students are required to take a standardized comprehensive exam at the end of the semester. Accelerated weight. ($25.00 fee for textbook and lab manual rental.)

Environmental Science, Grade 11 or 12

Environmental Science is an elective course that investigates Earth’s abiotic resources (water, air, etc.) and biotic resources (forests, wildlife, etc.) and how human activity impacts these resources through human population growth, farming, urbanization, and pollution, among other activities. Emphasis is placed on collecting, evaluating, and presenting scientific data through lab activities. Field trips will be taken during the fall and spring terms with our primary destinations being the Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust (PERT) and the ANC Educational Farm. A connection between Earth and the Lord’s kingdoms in Heaven, as seen through correspondences based on the Heavenly Doctrines of the New Church, will be discussed. 

Honors Environmental Science, Grade 11 or 12

Honors Environmental Science is an elective course that prepares students to take the AP Environmental Science test in May. The course investigates Earth’s abiotic resources (water, air, etc.) and biotic resources (forests, wildlife, etc.) and how human activity impacts these resources through human population growth, farming, urbanization, and pollution, among other activities. Emphasis is placed on collecting, evaluating, and presenting scientific data through lab activities. Field trips will be taken during the fall and spring terms with our primary destinations being the Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust (PERT) and the ANC Educational Farm. Students in the Honors section are prepared to take the AP Environmental Science test in May through regular practice with released AP Environmental Science free-response questions. Additionally, students in the Honors section write regular college-level laboratory reports for the labs completed in class. A connection between Earth and the Lord’s kingdoms in Heaven, as seen through correspondences based on the Heavenly Doctrines of the New Church, will be discussed. 

History

It is the goal of the History Department to help students better understand the development of the Human Race, and to see the cause and effect in history.

Grade 9: Ancient History†

Grade 10: European History†

Grade 11: Honors U.S. History; U.S. History†; Civics and Economics; Honors Civics and Economics

Grade 12: Civics and Economics; Honors Civics and Economics

For full course descriptions, click the individual course descriptions below. 

History Course Descriptions

Ancient History, Girls

A study of the origins of man and the beginnings of civilization. Emphasis is placed on the Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman cultures which have formed the basis of Western Civilization. Students learn about these cultures through readings from a variety of sources, including the Ancient and Medieval Worlds, and through class discussions. A large portion of the second and third trimester is invested in writing research papers. The development of religion in the various cultures is examined from both a New Church and secular point of view.

Ancient History, Boys

A study of the origins of man and the beginnings of civilization. Although Indian and Chinese civilizations will be discussed, emphasis will be placed on the Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman cultures which have formed the basis of Western Civilization. This is both a scholarly and moralistic endeavor. As a result, these areas will be examined from both a New Church and secular point of view. Subjects that bear a strong relevance to the formation of today’s society will be emphasized.

European History, Girls

The history of Christian Europe is important because it chronicles the span of the Christian Church, and explains the origin and growth of European culture that has become dominant worldwide. The first half of the course deals with the rise and growth of Christendom; the second with the crises and divisions which necessitated the establishment of a New Church. Topics include the religion, art, politics, geography, economics, and daily life of Europe as it moved through a period of incubation (1st through 8th centuries), a period of idealism (9th through 12th centuries), an age of upheaval and change (13th through 15th centuries), and an age of reformation and renaissance (15th through 18th centuries). Emphasis is placed on the study of female leaders of note and feminine contributions within each of these subject areas. Course work includes readings both in and out of our textbook, video, lecture, discussion and group work including a variety of projects designed to encourage students to use both their imagination and creativity in analyzing historical data.

European History, Boys

The history of Christian Europe is important because it chronicles the span of the Christian Church, and explains the origin and growth of European culture that has become dominant worldwide. The first half of the course deals with the rise and growth of Christendom; the second with the crises and divisions which necessitated the establishment of a New Church. Topics include the religion, art, politics, geography, economics, and daily life of Europe as it moved through a period of incubation (1st through 8th centuries), a period of idealism (9th through 12th centuries), an age of upheaval and change (13th through 15th centuries), and an age of reformation and renaissance (15th through 18th centuries). Course work includes readings both in and out of our textbook, video, lecture, discussion and group work including a variety of projects designed to encourage students to use both their imagination and creativity in analyzing historical data.

U.S. History, Girls

A study of American History from the Pre-Columbian era to the late 20th century. We will focus on social, political, and economic changes with an emphasis on how events of the past are relevant to our lives today. Students will practice key historical skills such as analysis of primary and secondary documents, research, source evaluation, and critical writing. Students may choose to take the course at a honors level. Honors students are expected to take the AP US History exam in May, attend study sessions, complete additional assignments in preparation for the AP exam, take weekly class quizzes without notes, and write five document-based question essays during the year. Honors students must be able to work independently and manage their time efficiently. 

U.S. History, Boys

A study of American History from the Pre-Columbian period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the important turning points in United States history as well as the political, economic and social development of the country. The purpose of study is not only to build the student's individual perspective, but also to improve study skills, problem solving skills, as well as writing skills. A special emphasis will be placed upon moral questions that arise throughout the course. An Honors American History option is available. Honors students will be held to a higher standard than regular history students on all work.  This applies to all parts of the class including tests, essays, participation, and class work. Often honors students will be given different assignments and will, in general, be required to write more.  Naturally, honors students will need to commit a greater amount of time to the class than those not signed up for Honors U.S. History.  Honors students are strongly encouraged to take the A.P. U.S. History test in the Spring (which costs $87).  In addition to these generalities there are a few specific differences:

  1. Honors students will not be allowed to use reading notes for reading quizzes.
  2. While honors students are encouraged to organize their work in a binder, they will not receive credit for turning in that binder.
  3. To be better prepared for the A.P. Tests, Honors students will be required to write  

    several Document-Based Questions in a timed format outside of class.

Civics and Economics

Civics and Economics explores how the principles of Government, Economics and History explain political and world events. Students will be encouraged to examine current events objectively by applying the skills of research and analysis involved in the study of Political Science. We will explore democracy, citizenship, power, liberty and freedom and how they relate to civil, moral and spiritual life. Finally, the course places an emphasis on critical thinking, teamwork and writing. This course offers an honors option.  Honors students will have their work held to a higher standard and will have their writing evaluated using a more strenuous rubric.  In addition, honors students will take more difficult tests, not be able to use reading notes on quizzes and are expected to lead predefined units.

Math

Grade 9†: Accelerated Geometry; Algebra 1; Applied Algebra 1

Grade 10†: Accelerated Algebra; Geometry; Accelerated Geometry

Grade 11†: Accelerated Algebra 2; Honors Precalculus; Algebra 2; Statistics

Grade 12: Algebra 3; Calculus; Precalculus; Statistics

View a chart of math course sequencing

†A Math is required in 9th, 10th, and 11th grade.

Courses in italics are coed.

To stay in the most accelerated track in Math, students must maintain an 80 average or better. If an underclassman earns an average grade of 80 or below, the student may only continue to the next accelerated course by successfully petitioning the department for an exception.

For full course descriptions, click the individual course tabs below.

Mathematics Course Descriptions

Algebra 1, Girls

A course which lays a foundation for using variables and expressions as a language for modeling. Topics include operations with rational and irrational numbers, evaluating and manipulating algebraic expressions, writing, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, working with polynomial, radical and rational expressions, and problem solving. An introduction to solving quadratic equations is also covered.

Algebra 1, Boys

A course which lays a foundation for using variables and expressions as a language for modeling. Topics include operations with rational and irrational numbers, evaluating and manipulating algebraic expressions, writing, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, working with polynomial, radical and rational expressions, and problem solving. An introduction to solving quadratic equations is also covered.

Applied Algebra 1

This freshman math course will review skills taught in Pre-Algebra and will take students through concepts taught in Algebra 1.  It will cover basic algebraic concepts, a review of arithmetic computations, solving equations with one variable, solving equations using exponents and polynomials, factoring polynomials, trinomials and expressions.  Students will engage in frequent review of learned skills and apply these skills to practical experiences that extend beyond the classroom.  Intended for students who need some review while learning Algebra 1, in preparation for Geometry as sophomores. 

Accelerated Geometry, Grade 9 or 10

This course covers all the topics of plane and 3-dimensional geometry (see below) at a faster pace and in greater depth. It includes transformations and coordinate geometry and emphasizes logic and proof. For freshmen or sophomores who have taken Algebra 1 and plan to take accelerated or honors math courses. Accelerated weight.

Geometry, Grade 10 Girls

This course provides a basis for further work in mathematics and related sciences. Facts about plane and 3-dimensional figures are developed in logical sequence, through concrete examples and exploration, to show the nature of mathematical reasoning. Topics include logic, constructions, congruence, similarity, circles, area, volume, the Pythagorean Theorem and trigonometric ratios. The ability to present deductive argument is developed, but this course relies more on inductive reasoning.

Geometry, Grade 10 Boys

This course provides a basis for further work in mathematics and related sciences. Facts about plane and 3-dimensional figures are developed in logical sequence, through concrete examples and exploration, to show the nature of mathematical reasoning. Topics include logic, constructions, congruence, similarity, circles, area, volume, the Pythagorean Theorem and trigonometric ratios. The ability to present deductive argument is developed, but this course relies more on inductive reasoning.

Accelerated Algebra , Grade 10

An Algebra 2 course for sophomores who have completed Algebra 1 and Geometry and wish to work toward taking Advanced Placement Calculus during senior year. This course covers all the topics of Algebra 2 with Trigonometry (see below) at a faster pace and in greater depth. Accelerated weight.

Algebra 2, Grade 11 Girls

This course emphasizes mastery of Algebra 1 skills and the development of new tools for problem solving. It includes operations with complex numbers and algebraic expressions, writing, solving and graphing polynomial equations and inequalities, and solving rational, radical and exponential equations. For juniors who have taken Algebra 1 and Geometry. This course is not a preparation for Pre-calculus.

Algebra 2, Grade 11 Boys

This course emphasizes mastery of Algebra 1 skills and the development of new tools for problem solving. It includes operations with complex numbers and algebraic expressions, writing, solving and graphing polynomial equations and inequalities, and solving rational, radical and exponential equations. For juniors who have taken Algebra 1 and Geometry. This course is not a preparation for Pre-calculus.

Accelerated Algebra 2, Grade 11

This course covers all the topics of Algebra 2 at a faster pace and in greater depth. It concludes with a review of right triangle trigonometry and an introduction to trigonometric functions. For juniors who have taken Algebra 1 and Geometry and plan to take Precalculus. Accelerated weight.

Honors Precalculus, Grade 11

This course explores functions in depth as a preparation for Advanced Placement Calculus. Both analytic and graphical perspectives are used, including concepts of translations, transformations, composition and inverse functions. Topics include polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions as well as analytic geometry. For juniors who have taken Geometry and Algebra 2. Honors weight.

Honors Statistics, Grade 11 or 12

A course in exploratory analysis, planning probability, and statistical inference, per the College Board syllabus, for accelerated juniors who are ready to undertake work at the college level. This course requires extensive homework and culminates in the Advanced Placement Statistics examination. Each student should own a graphing calculator. Students will have the opportunity to tie all the course’s themes together in a final project and presentation. For sophomores and juniors who are ahead of their accelerated track peers. Also available as an elective for seniors who have completed Accelerated Algebra 2 or Pre-calculus. Honors weight.

Algebra 3, Grade 12

This course continues the study of functions begun in Algebra 2, including analytic geometry and solutions of higher order equations. A portion of the course is devoted to trigonometry and its applications. Topics include a review of right triangle trigonometry, then the unit circle, radian measure of an angle, graphs of trigonometric functions, their translations and transformation. This course does not satisfy the fourth year mathematics requirement for a Comprehensive Diploma. Only for seniors who have taken a regular Algebra 2 course.

Honors Calculus, Grade 12

An introduction to differential and integral calculus, per the College Board syllabus, for accelerated seniors who are ready to undertake work at the college level. Topics are considered from analytical, numerical and graphical perspectives. Graphing calculators are used extensively, and students will learn when and how to apply this technology when solving problems. Each student is also expected to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination. For seniors who have taken Pre-calculus. Honors weight.

Precalculus, Grade 12

This course explores functions as a preparation for Calculus in college. Both analytic and graphical perspectives are used, including concepts of translations, transformations, composition and inverse functions. Topics include polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions, with a particular emphasis on trigonometry and its applications. For seniors who have taken Accelerated Algebra 2. Accelerated weight.

PE/Health

Grade 9: Health; Physical Education

Grade 10: Health; Physical Education

Grade 11: Health; Physical Education

Grade 12: Physical Education

  • Health is required in 9th, 10th, and 11th grade.
  • Students must be enrolled in either a sport or a P.E. each term.
  • At least one term of Physical Education must be taken per year.
  • Dance may be taken in lieu of a P.E. once per year.

For full course descriptions, click the individual course tabs below.

Health and Physical Education Course Descriptions

Health 1, Grade 9 Girls

In this course, we will focus on physical health and wellness. We will look at the various factors that contribute to physical health.  The specific topics covered will include nutrition, exercise, sleep, and stress. There will be a variety of different exercise options introduced, as well as stress management techniques. There will also be a lot of discussion and students will be expected to journal about the various topics discussed, as well as demonstrate their knowledge on tests and in the form of a final project. All the material will be approached from a New Church perspective.

Health, Grade 9 Boys

This class focuses on three components involved in a Healthy Lifestyle: physical fitness, stress management, and nutritional balance. Students are exposed to basic fitness principles and learn why choosing a physically active lifestyle is important. In stress management students learn how various physical and psychological demands effect their bodies. Positive coping skills are emphasized. Students also learn about the negative effects of using drugs and alcohol as coping devices so they do not resort to these techniques. The study of nutritional balance includes resting metabolic rates, macronutrients, food selection, diet fads, and eating disorders.

Health 2, Grade 10 Girls

In this course, we will focus on mental and emotional health. We will look at the various factors that contribute to emotional and mental health. The specific topics covered will include drugs, alcohol, disease, and body image. There will be a variety of guest speakers who will share their stories and experiences with these issues. There will also be a lot of discussion and students will be expected to journal about the various topics discussed, as well as demonstrate their knowledge on test and in the form of a final project. All the material will be approached from a New Church perspective.

Health 2, Grade 10 Boys

This course is divided into two units. In the first phase the physical fitness component of Healthy Lifestyles will be studied in greater depth. Sophomores will learn the practical aspects of designing, implementing, and monitoring their own fitness programs. During the second part students take a CPR course where they learn how to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use an Automated External Defibrillator. Tobacco’s negative effects on the body and the prevention of heart disease and strokes are also emphasized.

Health 3, Grade 11 Girls

In this course, we will focus on sexual health and relationships. We will look at the various factors that contribute to healthy and unhealthy relationships, both sexual and platonic. The specific topics covered will include reproduction, contraception, premarital sex, and abuse. There will be a variety of guest speakers who will share their stories or experiences with these issues. There will also be a lot of discussion and students will be expected to journal about the various topics discussed, as well as demonstrate their knowledge on tests and in the form of a final project. All the material will be approached from a New Church perspective.

Health 3, Grade 11 Boys

This course introduces boys to a wide variety of health topics, from dietary health to physical fitness

Languages

Studying a second (or third) language not only provides insight into other cultures and ways of thinking, but also helps us understand and clarify our own language and thought.

Grade 9: Latin 1

Grade 10: French 1; French 2; Latin 2; Spanish 1; Spanish 2

Grade 11: French 1; French 2; French 3; Latin 2; Latin 3/4; Spanish 1; Spanish 2; Spanish 3

Grade 12: French 1; French 2; French 3; Latin 2; Latin 3/4; Spanish 1; Spanish 2; Spanish 3

For full course descriptions, click the individual course descriptions below.

Languages Course Descriptions

Latin 1, Girls

This is an introductory Latin course which aims to give students a grasp of the fundamentals of Classical Latin and ancient Roman culture. With the use of a reading-based textbook, Ecce Romani I, students use readings in Latin to generate an understanding of the basics of grammar. These same readings generate study of related cultural topics. Students are exposed to extensive use of oral Latin in the classroom and learn to both understand spoken Latin and to respond in Latin to basic work in grammar and comprehension, as well as some limited Latin composition. A $10.00 supply fee is due the first day of class. Course material is supplemented by gender-focused readings on the place of women in Roman society and biographical studies of Roman historical figures.

Latin 1, Boys

This is an introductory Latin course which aims to give students a grasp of the fundamentals of Classical Latin and ancient Roman culture. With the use of a reading-based textbook, Ecce Romani I, students use readings in Latin to generate an understanding of the basics of grammar. These same readings generate study of related cultural topics. Students are exposed to extensive use of oral Latin in the classroom and learn to both understand spoken Latin and to respond in Latin to basic work in grammar and comprehension, as well as some limited Latin composition. A $10.00 supply fee is due the first day of class. Course material is supplemented by biographical studies of Roman historical figures.

Latin 2, Grades 10, 11, and 12

This is an intermediate level Latin course open to students who have a solid grounding in introductory Latin. Students continue their study of Latin forms, syntax, and vocabulary through extensive exposure to Latin readings in Ecce Romani II, in addition to cultural studies in Roman entertainment, food, and social life. They also continue to develop their skills in Latin composition and their ability to comprehend and respond in Latin. The focus of this intermediate year is an introduction to more advanced Latin syntax in preparation for the reading of classical authors and Swedenborg in Advanced Latin. A $10.00 supply fee is due the first day of class.

Latin 3/4, Grades 11 and/or 12

This course concentrates on reading authentic Latin written by native speakers of the classical world and Swedenborg’s neo-Latin. Students will read a variety of authors. Students begin by reviewing grammar and reading skills, then move on to reading and translation. Part of the course is dedicated to reading classical Latin prose, including selections by authors such as Pliny, Caesar, Cicero, and Eutropius. Another part of the course focuses on classical Latin poetry by Horace, Catullus, Vergil, and Ovid. Selections are chosen primarily from Ecce Romani III, and are aimed at furthering students’ understanding of the ancient world through topics that will interest them. Advanced Latin students will also be reading selections from the Vulgate (Latin) Bible and experience the delight of reading the Heavenly Doctrines. Presupposes a solid grounding in basic Latin forms and grammar. Course content is alternated yearly so that it can be repeated as Latin 4. (Latin 3 is Honors weight; Latin 4 is Accelerated weight.)

French 1, Grades 10, 11, or 12

This is an introductory course in French. Students will acquire listening skills, reading skills, writing skills and speaking skills primarily through the “Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling” (TPRS) and comprehensible input (CI) methods. These methods focus on learning -in an easily comprehensible way- through creation of stories. This aural and visual repetition of key structures allows for increased language retention. Students will read the stories they create, as well as other similar stories. In this first year, the students will primarily learn the present and near future tenses, and also be introduced to some past tenses (the near past, compound past and the imperfect). Students will study and listen to French music. Students will also watch a variety of videos, such as films in French, and cultural videos. Field trips will include nearby resources such as ANC Farm to harvest herbs and vegetables in preparation for cooking French dishes and Glencairn Museum to examine medieval French art.

French 2, Grades 10, 11, or 12

In French 2, students will continue to acquire listening skills, reading skills, writing skills and speaking skills primarily through the “Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling” (TPRS) and comprehensible input (CI) methods -with increased complexity and depth. These methods focus on learning -in an easily comprehensible way- through creation of stories. This aural and visual repetition of key structures allows for increased language retention. Students will read the stories they create, as well as other similar stories.

In this year, the students will focus on two past tenses (the compound past and the imperfect), the present tense, and be introduced to future and conditional tenses. Students will study and listen to French music. Students will also watch a variety of videos, such as films in French, and cultural videos. Field trips will include nearby resources such as ANC Farm to harvest herbs and vegetables in preparation for cooking French dishes, the school's kitchen to cook the French dishes, and Glencairn Museum to examine medieval French art.

French 3, Grades 11 or 12

In French 3, students will continue to acquire listening skills, reading skills, writing skills and speaking skills through the “Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling” (TPRS) and comprehensible input (CI) methods. These methods focus on learning -in an easily comprehensible way- through creation of stories. This aural and visual repetition of key structures allows for increased language retention. Students will read the stories they create, as well as other similar stories. By building on the foundation gained in French 2, French 3 students will further increase the complexity and depth of their knowledge

In this year, students will continue to focus on past tenses (the compound past, the imperfect and the pluperfect), the present tense, and students will also get some detailed focus on the future and conditional tenses. Students will study and listen to French music. Students will also watch a variety of videos, such as films in French, and cultural videos. Field trips will include nearby resources such as ANC Farm to harvest herbs and vegetables in preparation for cooking French dishes, the school's kitchen to cook the French dishes, and Glencairn Museum to examine medieval French art. In the winter and spring, students will create and teach French lessons for the 3rd grade at Bryn Athyn Church School.

Spanish 1, Grades 10, 11, or 12

The central goal of Spanish 1 is communication. Listening, speaking, reading and writing are used to facilitate the student's acquisition of Spanish. The class is conducted in Spanish so that the students are consistently hearing and using the target language. Developing an awareness of and appreciation for Hispanic culture is another important element in Spanish 1. Classroom activities are organized to put the students at their ease so that they may relax and enjoy learning and communicating in Spanish.

Spanish 2, Grades 10, 11, or 12

The goal of this class is to make the students independent users of Spanish, to gain a new, objective view of their own language and culture, and to give students an understanding of the people who speak Spanish. Topics include classroom life, daily activities, holidays, movies, cooking and travel. Free expression and creative use of the language are encouraged through role plays of specific situations such as going to a hotel, taking a train trip and planning a quinceañera party. Grammar will be studied as a means for effective communication and points of emphasis include: review of Spanish 1 grammar, reflexive verbs, and preterit and imperfect tenses and the subjunctive. Reading, writing, listening, speaking and culture are emphasized in a proficiency-oriented approach. Spanish is the language of instruction.

Spanish 3, Grades 11 or 12

Continuation of Spanish 2. The focus is on improving and fine-tuning communication skills and using more advanced grammatical structures. Topics include weather; nutrition and exercise; histories of Spain and Latin America; and music, art and dancing. Points of emphasis include: the future, subjunctive and conditional tenses and their uses. Classroom activities directly involve students in the language acquisition process. Reading, writing, listening, speaking and culture are emphasized in a proficiency-oriented approach. Spanish is the language of instruction.

Religion

In the Religion Department, we encourage students to engage in the important questions of life. 

Grade 9: Religion 1: The Gospel of John†

Grade 10: Religion 2: Heaven and Hell†

Grade 11: Religion 3: True Christianity†; Comparative Religions

Grade 12: Religion 4: Marriage Love†; Comparative Religions

For full course descriptions, click the individual course descriptions below. 

Religion Course Descriptions

Religion 1: The Gospel of John, Girls

Students in this course complete an in-depth study of the Gospel of John. The study includes a basic overview of the canon of Divine Revelation (Old Testament, New Testament and the Writings) as well as a study of how this Gospel introduces fundamental doctrines of the New Church. We will emphasize what the Gospel of John reveals about the nature of God and His action in our lives, and how He leads each person individually toward heaven. Through this study the student will learn how important it is to continually strengthen and expand a personal relationship with a visible God and understand how the Lord’s life reflects the unity of perfect wisdom in human form.

Religion 1: The Gospel of John, Boys

Students in this course complete an in-depth study of the Gospel of John. The study includes a basic overview of the canon of Divine Revelation (Old Testament, New Testament and the Writings) as well as a study of how this Gospel introduces fundamental doctrines of the New Church. We will emphasize what the Gospel of John reveals about the nature of God and His action in our lives, and how He leads each person individually toward heaven. Through this study the student will learn how important it is to continually strengthen and expand a personal relationship with a visible God and understand how the Lord’s life reflects the unity of perfect wisdom in human form.

Religion 2: Heaven and Hell, Girls

This course introduces students to the unique and inspiring teachings of the New Church on life after death in the book Heaven and Hell by Emanuel Swedenborg. Topics include: who goes to heaven and how they get there; who goes to hell and how they get there; how the Lord rules heaven and hell and how he rules earth by means of them; the experience of living in heaven; things you see and do in heaven; marriage in heaven; the true nature of hell; what ‘Judgment Day’ really is; how we are resurrected at death and the process we go through to enter our eternal home; and our connection with spirits and the spiritual realm. The course will also include a unit on Near Death Experiences (NDE’s) and how these experiences relate to new Church teachings. The course has a special focus not only on what happens after death but how these teachings relate to our lives right now.

Religion 2: Heaven and Hell, Boys

This course introduces students to the unique and inspiring teachings of the New Church on life after death in the book Heaven and Hell by Emanuel Swedenborg. Topics include: who goes to heaven and how they get there; who goes to hell and how they get there; how the Lord rules heaven and hell and how he rules earth by means of them; the experience of living in heaven; things you see and do in heaven; marriage in heaven; the true nature of hell; what ‘Judgment Day’ really is; how we are resurrected at death and the process we go through to enter our eternal home; and our connection with spirits and the spiritual realm. The course will also include a unit on Near Death Experiences (NDE’s) and how these experiences relate to new Church teachings. The course has a special focus not only on what happens after death but how these teachings relate to our lives right now.

Religion 3: True Christianity, Girls

This course takes a topical approach to the core teachings of the New Church, and how they relate to life, with the goal of giving students the tools they need to live a moral and spiritual life. The course will explore who the Lord is and how we can know Him; how He communicates His universal principles of faith and love to us; who we are in relation to the Lord, to creation and to other people; and how a life of service to the Lord and the neighbor enables a person to grow spiritually within, at the same time the person exercises charity in his or her daily activities. A key component of the course will be applying the principles of morality and spirituality in the Ten Commandments to real life situations and how concepts like conscience, free will, rationality, repentance, reformation and regeneration come alive through these situations.

Religion 3: True Christianity, Boys

This course takes a topical approach to the core teachings of the New Church, and how they relate to life, with the goal of giving students the tools they need to live a moral and spiritual life. The course will explore who the Lord is and how we can know Him; how He communicates His universal principles of faith and love to us; who we are in relation to the Lord, to creation and to other people; and how a life of service to the Lord and the neighbor enables a person to grow spiritually within, at the same time the person exercises charity in his or her daily activities. A key component of the course will be applying the principles of morality and spirituality in the Ten Commandments to real life situations and how concepts like conscience, free will, rationality, repentance, reformation and regeneration come alive through these situations.

Religion 4: Marriage Love, Girls

This course introduces students to the revolutionary and inspirational teachings of the New Church on marriage in the book Conjugial Love by Emanuel Swedenborg. Topics include the spiritual vision of marriage (conjugial) love; why the Lord created males and females as distinctly different from each other and how they complement each other; what a ‘soul mate’ really is and how to be one; sex, love and intimacy, and the destructive nature of sexual perversions. Students will be taught about the progression of dating, courtship, engagement/betrothal and marriage; how to have a happy marriage; what key factors contribute to marital disharmony and breakdown; and why marriage matters. There is a special emphasis on teachings that speak to the concerns of secondary school age students and how current social research connects with New Church teachings on marriage and relationships.

Religion 4: Marriage Love, Boys

This course introduces students to the revolutionary and inspirational teachings of the New Church on marriage in the book Conjugial Love by Emanuel Swedenborg. Topics include the spiritual vision of marriage (conjugial) love; why the Lord created males and females as distinctly different from each other and how they complement each other; what a ‘soul mate’ really is and how to be one; sex, love and intimacy, and the destructive nature of sexual perversions. Students will be taught about the progression of dating, courtship, engagement/betrothal and marriage; how to have a happy marriage; what key factors contribute to marital disharmony and breakdown; and why marriage matters. There is a special emphasis on teachings that speak to the concerns of secondary school age students and how current social research connects with New Church teachings on marriage and relationships.

Comparative Religions, Grade 11 or 12

This course examines the major Eastern and Western religions plus minor faith groups and modern religious movements and trends in both an historical and comparative context. Students will learn through a variety of mediums including videos, textbooks, sacred scriptures, internet sources, individual and group presentations, guest speakers and field trips. Through this course students will gain a greater understanding of and deeper appreciation for the powerful role religion plays in people’s lives throughout the world, a clearer vision of how the Lord leads people of all faiths through universal truths, a broader perspective on the universality and uniqueness of New Church teachings, and a greater ability to articulate and communicate their own faith more effectively through the language of world religion.