Academics

Courses | History

All courses meet four periods a week for 4 points credit per term. Unless otherwise noted, all courses are college prep weight. While not officially designated as such, the courses offered by the department will, with help from the instructor, prepare students to take the Advanced Placement (AP) U.S. History test. Students should contact the department head and course teacher at the beginning of the course if interested in taking the AP test. The senior elective courses listed below are offered on a rotating basis, determined by staffing and student interest. Assignments may be required to be word processed.

Girls History Courses
Boys History Courses
Ancient History – Grade 9† Ancient History – Grade 9†
A study of the origins of man and the beginnings of civilization. Emphasis is placed on the Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman cultures which have formed the basis of Western Civilization. Students learn about these cultures through readings from a variety of sources, including Ancient and Medieval Worlds, and through class discussions. A large portion of the second and third trimester is invested in writing research papers. The development of religion in the various cultures is examined from both a New Church and secular point of view. A study of the origins of man and the beginnings of civilization. Although Indian and Chinese civilizations will be discussed, emphasis will be placed on the Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman cultures which have formed the basis of Western Civilization. This is both a scholarly and moralistic endeavor. As a result, these areas will be examined from both a New Church and secular point of view. Subjects that bear a strong relevance to the formation of today’s society will be emphasized.
European History – Grade 10† European History – Grade 10†
The history of Christian Europe is important because it chronicles the span of the Christian Church, and explains the origin and growth of European culture that has become dominant worldwide. The first half of the course deals with the rise and growth of Christendom; the second with the crises and divisions which necessitated the establishment of a New Church. Topics include the religion, art, politics, geography, economics, and daily life of Europe as it moved through a period of incubation (1st through 8th centuries), a period of idealism (9th through 12th centuries), an age of upheaval and change (13th through 15th centuries), and an age of reformation and renaissance (15th through 18th centuries). Emphasis is placed on the study of female leaders of note and feminine contributions within each of these subject areas. Course work includes readings both in and out of our textbook, video, lecture, discussion and group work including a variety of projects designed to encourage students to use both their imagination and creativity in analyzing historical data. The history of Christian Europe is important because it chronicles the span of the Christian Church, and explains the origin and growth of European culture that has become dominant worldwide. The first half of the course deals with the rise and growth of Christendom; the second with the crises and divisions which necessitated the establishment of a New Church. Topics include the religion, art, politics, geography, economics, and daily life of Europe as it moved through a period of incubation (1st through 8th centuries), a period of idealism (9th through 12th centuries), an age of upheaval and change (13th through 15th centuries), and an age of reformation and renaissance (15th through 18th centuries). Course work includes readings both in and out of our textbook, video, lecture, discussion and group work including a variety of projects designed to encourage students to use both their imagination and creativity in analyzing historical data.
U.S. History – Grade 11† U.S. History – Grade 11†
A study of American History from the Pre-Columbian era to the late 20th century. We will focus on social, political, and economic changes with an emphasis on how events of the past are relevant to our lives today. Students will practice key historical skills such as analysis of primary and secondary documents, research, source evaluation, and critical writing. Students may choose to take the course at a honors level. Honors students are expected to take the AP US History exam in May, attend study sessions, complete additional assignments in preparation for the AP exam, take weekly class quizzes without notes, and write five document-based question essays during the year. Honors students must be able to work independently and manage their time efficiently

A study of American History from the Pre-Columbian period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the important turning points in United States history as well as the political, economic and social development of the country. The purpose of study is not only to build the student's individual perspective, but also to improve study skills, problem solving skills, as well as writing skills. A special emphasis will be placed upon moral questions that arise throughout the course. An Honors American History option is available. Honors students will be held to a higher standard than regular history students on all work.  This applies to all parts of the class including tests, essays, participation, and class work. Often honors students will be given different assignments and will, in general, be required to write more.  Naturally, honors students will need to commit a greater amount of time to the class than those not signed up for Honors U.S. History.  Honors students are strongly encouraged to take the A.P. U.S. History test in the Spring (which costs $87).  In addition to these generalities there are a few specific differences:

  1. Honors students will not be allowed to use reading notes for reading quizzes.
  2. While honors students are encouraged to organize their work in a binder, they will not receive credit for turning in that binder.
  3. To be better prepared for the A.P. Tests, Honors students will be required to write 

    several Document-Based Questions in a timed format outside of class.

 

 
Co-Ed History Courses
Survey of Ancient and Medieval History (ESL Freshman History) – Grade 9
This course covers the periods from Pre history through the Renaissance. Focus is on understanding how civilizations and cultures are structured and evolve due to geographical location, language formation and interaction with other cultures. Each section studied covers a major historical culture incorporating key terms and concepts associated with that culture/civilization.
Civics and Economics – Grades 11 and 12
Civics and Economics explores how the principles of Government, Economics and History explain political and world events. Students will be encouraged to examine current events objectively by applying the skills of research and analysis involved in the study of Political Science. We will explore democracy, citizenship, power, liberty and freedom and how they relate to civil, moral and spiritual life. Finally, the course places an emphasis on critical thinking, teamwork and writing. This course offers an honors option.  Honors students will have their work held to a higher standard and will have their writing evaluated using a more strenuous rubric.  In addition, honors students will take more difficult tests, not be able to use reading notes on quizzes and are expected to lead predefined units.

†Required.

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